Better care at lower cost; Reducing harm from catheter-associated urinary tract infections
BAUS ePoster online library. Simpson R. 06/29/16; 131987; P8-17
Dr. Richard Simpson
Dr. Richard Simpson
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
P8-17

Introduction

Urinary catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CaUTI) results in approximately 3500 deaths/year in the UK. Current data suggests that up to 25% of patients in acute trusts have a catheter inserted which may be unnecessary in 30-50% of cases.  70% of CaUTIs are preventable with current evidence-based strategies.  The additional cost associated with treating a CaUTI is estimated to be £1000-£2500.

We postulated that developing a strategy to avoid inappropriate catheterisation would reduce the incidence and harm associated with CaUTI.

Materials and Methods

Following an audit of catheter utilisation and CaUTI in the trust, we undertook a quality improvement initiative to reduce CaUTI rates. Two main strategies were adopted, namely avoiding unnecessary catheter insertion and removing catheters as early as possible. We devised and implemented several novel trust-wide measures including:

  • Standardised indications for catheterisation
  • Daily nurse-led review of the appropriateness of catheter indication for all catheterised patients
  • A nurse-led trial without catheter protocol

 Results

In the last 12 months we have achieved:

  1. A fall in the mean inpatient CaUTI rate per 10,000 bed days from 17.5 to 9.4 (46% reduction)
  2. A fall in the mean percentage of catheterised inpatients from 22% to 18% (17.8% reduction)
  3. A fall in the percentage of inappropriate catheters from 20% to 10% (50% reduction)

Conclusion

Our work demonstrates that implementing a range of simple measures can effectively reduce CaUTI. Adoption of these measures in UK healthcare settings has the potential to reduce the serious avoidable morbidity and potential mortality that CaUTI presents. 

P8-17

Introduction

Urinary catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CaUTI) results in approximately 3500 deaths/year in the UK. Current data suggests that up to 25% of patients in acute trusts have a catheter inserted which may be unnecessary in 30-50% of cases.  70% of CaUTIs are preventable with current evidence-based strategies.  The additional cost associated with treating a CaUTI is estimated to be £1000-£2500.

We postulated that developing a strategy to avoid inappropriate catheterisation would reduce the incidence and harm associated with CaUTI.

Materials and Methods

Following an audit of catheter utilisation and CaUTI in the trust, we undertook a quality improvement initiative to reduce CaUTI rates. Two main strategies were adopted, namely avoiding unnecessary catheter insertion and removing catheters as early as possible. We devised and implemented several novel trust-wide measures including:

  • Standardised indications for catheterisation
  • Daily nurse-led review of the appropriateness of catheter indication for all catheterised patients
  • A nurse-led trial without catheter protocol

 Results

In the last 12 months we have achieved:

  1. A fall in the mean inpatient CaUTI rate per 10,000 bed days from 17.5 to 9.4 (46% reduction)
  2. A fall in the mean percentage of catheterised inpatients from 22% to 18% (17.8% reduction)
  3. A fall in the percentage of inappropriate catheters from 20% to 10% (50% reduction)

Conclusion

Our work demonstrates that implementing a range of simple measures can effectively reduce CaUTI. Adoption of these measures in UK healthcare settings has the potential to reduce the serious avoidable morbidity and potential mortality that CaUTI presents. 

Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies