How confident do general practitioners feel about urology?
BAUS ePoster online library. Boxall N. 06/29/16; 131990; P8-20
Mr. Nicholas Boxall
Mr. Nicholas Boxall
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
P8-20

Introduction

Urological problems account for around 10% of primary care encounters. Referral rates of general urology to secondary care are rising every year and confidence in clinical assessment in primary care might be a factor in this. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors contributing to General Practitioners’ (GPs’) confidence in assessing urological conditions.

Methods

A paper survey of GPs surgeries across England assessing self-evaluated confidence in performing and interpreting digital rectal examination (DRE) and scrotal examination based on two clinical scenarios, grading responses on a five-point Likert scale.

Results

Of 357 respondents (226 male, 131 female), 88% were confident in performing DRE and scrotal examination with fewer reporting confidence in interpreting the findings (72.8% and 69.2% respectively). Female respondents were less confident in both performing and interpreting DRE and scrotal examination (p<0.0001). Neither age nor prior urological training impacted on confidence performing or interpreting urological clinical examination. Participants had mixed views on whether further training on DRE or scrotal examination would improve their confidence (45.3% and 61.6% respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between gender, age or prior urological experience with respect to the perceived impact of extra training on confidence.

Conclusions

Females made up 37.1% of the GP workforce in 2003 increasing to 48.5% in 2013. Despite possible underrepresentation of female respondents, a gap between male and female GPs’ confidence at performing and interpreting urological examinations was identified in this survey. Prior urology training does not appear to impact on confidence in urological clinical examination.

P8-20

Introduction

Urological problems account for around 10% of primary care encounters. Referral rates of general urology to secondary care are rising every year and confidence in clinical assessment in primary care might be a factor in this. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors contributing to General Practitioners’ (GPs’) confidence in assessing urological conditions.

Methods

A paper survey of GPs surgeries across England assessing self-evaluated confidence in performing and interpreting digital rectal examination (DRE) and scrotal examination based on two clinical scenarios, grading responses on a five-point Likert scale.

Results

Of 357 respondents (226 male, 131 female), 88% were confident in performing DRE and scrotal examination with fewer reporting confidence in interpreting the findings (72.8% and 69.2% respectively). Female respondents were less confident in both performing and interpreting DRE and scrotal examination (p<0.0001). Neither age nor prior urological training impacted on confidence performing or interpreting urological clinical examination. Participants had mixed views on whether further training on DRE or scrotal examination would improve their confidence (45.3% and 61.6% respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between gender, age or prior urological experience with respect to the perceived impact of extra training on confidence.

Conclusions

Females made up 37.1% of the GP workforce in 2003 increasing to 48.5% in 2013. Despite possible underrepresentation of female respondents, a gap between male and female GPs’ confidence at performing and interpreting urological examinations was identified in this survey. Prior urology training does not appear to impact on confidence in urological clinical examination.

Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies