The contribution of Sir Thomas Spencer Wells to urology
BAUS ePoster online library. Wanis M. 06/29/16; 131993; P9-3
Mr. Michael Wanis
Mr. Michael Wanis
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Abstract
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P9-3

Introduction

 

Sir Thomas Spencer Wells served in Malta as a naval surgeon before establishing his own practice in London in 1853. He is most notably recognised in the fields of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Ophthalmology. He was Surgeon to Queen Victoria’s Household from 1863-1896. Although his contribution to Urology is less well known, he was founding member of St Peter’s Hospital for Stone in London in 1860, the first hospital in Britain dedicated to urology.

 

 

Methods

 

A literature review was performed on the contribution of Spencer Wells to urology using Medline, Embase, Public Records Library and other sources.

 

 

Results

 

In 1860 Spencer Wells gathered with Armstrong Todd, Reverend Whatton and TP Aldershaw to discuss establishing a hospital for urinary stones. He subsequently published a paper in the press campaigning for a hospital dedicated to urinary diseases. St Peter’s Hospital for stone was established in 1860. Wells practiced there until 1862 after which he departed to work at the Samaritan Free Hospital For Women. Whilst there, Wells was one of the first surgeons to recognise urinary tract injuries whilst pioneering ovarian cystectomy. After his death in 1897, St Peter’s committee acknowledged Wells for maintaining an interest in the hospital’s welfare throughout his career.

 

 

Conclusions

 

Sir Thomas Spencer Wells was a founding member of St Peter’s Hospital and continued to contribute to urology throughout his career. This was one of the first specialist hospitals in London at the time and its establishment was a catalyst for the development of urology as a specialty.

P9-3

Introduction

 

Sir Thomas Spencer Wells served in Malta as a naval surgeon before establishing his own practice in London in 1853. He is most notably recognised in the fields of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Ophthalmology. He was Surgeon to Queen Victoria’s Household from 1863-1896. Although his contribution to Urology is less well known, he was founding member of St Peter’s Hospital for Stone in London in 1860, the first hospital in Britain dedicated to urology.

 

 

Methods

 

A literature review was performed on the contribution of Spencer Wells to urology using Medline, Embase, Public Records Library and other sources.

 

 

Results

 

In 1860 Spencer Wells gathered with Armstrong Todd, Reverend Whatton and TP Aldershaw to discuss establishing a hospital for urinary stones. He subsequently published a paper in the press campaigning for a hospital dedicated to urinary diseases. St Peter’s Hospital for stone was established in 1860. Wells practiced there until 1862 after which he departed to work at the Samaritan Free Hospital For Women. Whilst there, Wells was one of the first surgeons to recognise urinary tract injuries whilst pioneering ovarian cystectomy. After his death in 1897, St Peter’s committee acknowledged Wells for maintaining an interest in the hospital’s welfare throughout his career.

 

 

Conclusions

 

Sir Thomas Spencer Wells was a founding member of St Peter’s Hospital and continued to contribute to urology throughout his career. This was one of the first specialist hospitals in London at the time and its establishment was a catalyst for the development of urology as a specialty.

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