Reed Miller Nesbit: So Much More Than A Straightening Procedure
BAUS ePoster online library. Wharton I. 06/29/16; 131995; P9-5
Mr. Iain Wharton
Mr. Iain Wharton
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P9-5

Reed Nesbit (1898-1979) graduated from Stanford, before gaining surgical residency at Ann Arbour, Michigan. Under Hugh Cabot’s tutelage, and whilst rooming with Charles Huggins, he published prolifically and progressed to become the first head of the Urology department.

His contribution to paediatric urology was significant. In 1931, Cabot and Nesbit described their single-stage orchidopexy procedure, which included their much citied method of testicular mobilisation. Nesbit(1940) subsequently described a two-stage repair for hypospadias consisting initially of chordee correction and ventral resurfacing using buttonhole transposition of the prepuce. A Z-plasty technique to correct stricture of the interval meatus was also reported (1954).

After a lecture by Theodore Davis(1931), Nesbit first revolutionised and then popularised transurethral resection of the prostate. He modified the Stern-McCathy resectoscope by extending the loop beyond the sheath and spring-loading the mechanism. Observing intravenous haemolysis, he introduced isotonic glycine for irrigation and limited operative time to 60-minutes (1948).

Combining cystometry with neurological examination, Nesbit and resident Lapides concluded that the bladder was controlled by two reflex arcs and then classified neurogenic bladder types (1947).

As ureterosigmoidostomy, the then favoured technique for urinary diversion, was frequently complicated by anastomotic stenosis, Nesbit (1948) developed a method of ureteric spatulation with mucosa-mucosa anastomosis which lowered the stricture rate.

In 1964, Nesbit described the surgical procedure for which he is synonymous. Initially used for correcting congenital penile curvature, it was subsequently adopted by Pryor & Fitzpatrick for the management of Peyronie’s disease (1979).

Prior to retirement (1967), Nesbit became the first urologist to be President of the American College of Surgeons; a fitting finale to his remarkable career.

P9-5

Reed Nesbit (1898-1979) graduated from Stanford, before gaining surgical residency at Ann Arbour, Michigan. Under Hugh Cabot’s tutelage, and whilst rooming with Charles Huggins, he published prolifically and progressed to become the first head of the Urology department.

His contribution to paediatric urology was significant. In 1931, Cabot and Nesbit described their single-stage orchidopexy procedure, which included their much citied method of testicular mobilisation. Nesbit(1940) subsequently described a two-stage repair for hypospadias consisting initially of chordee correction and ventral resurfacing using buttonhole transposition of the prepuce. A Z-plasty technique to correct stricture of the interval meatus was also reported (1954).

After a lecture by Theodore Davis(1931), Nesbit first revolutionised and then popularised transurethral resection of the prostate. He modified the Stern-McCathy resectoscope by extending the loop beyond the sheath and spring-loading the mechanism. Observing intravenous haemolysis, he introduced isotonic glycine for irrigation and limited operative time to 60-minutes (1948).

Combining cystometry with neurological examination, Nesbit and resident Lapides concluded that the bladder was controlled by two reflex arcs and then classified neurogenic bladder types (1947).

As ureterosigmoidostomy, the then favoured technique for urinary diversion, was frequently complicated by anastomotic stenosis, Nesbit (1948) developed a method of ureteric spatulation with mucosa-mucosa anastomosis which lowered the stricture rate.

In 1964, Nesbit described the surgical procedure for which he is synonymous. Initially used for correcting congenital penile curvature, it was subsequently adopted by Pryor & Fitzpatrick for the management of Peyronie’s disease (1979).

Prior to retirement (1967), Nesbit became the first urologist to be President of the American College of Surgeons; a fitting finale to his remarkable career.

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