The ‘Holy Stones’
BAUS ePoster online library. Satchi M. 06/29/16; 131997; P9-7
Ms. Maria Satchi
Ms. Maria Satchi
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Abstract
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P9-7

Introduction

In spite of their divine powers, the holy men and women have suffered from urinary stones since antiquity. This presentation explores the fascinating history.

Methods

A search for sources was undertaken using the Internet and library sources.

Results

St Alban of Mainz is said to be the patron saint of kidney stones. The Greek Philosopher Epicurus who preached freedom from fear (ataraxia) and from pain (aponia) died from an obstructing ureteric stone (270BC). Pope Innocent XI underwent surgery for kidney stones and following his death in 1689, he was found to have "stones weighing nine ounces in the left kidney and six ounces in the right”.  Martin Luther, a German monk, was also a sufferer of kidney stones. He consequently almost faced death from being ‘unable to urinate’. It was the movement of the carriage on the journey home that prompted spontaneous stone passage and ‘spared his life.’ The Bishop of Chester and founder of the Royal Society, John Wilkins, had the distinction of heading a college at both the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. To treat his kidney stones, he was fed, "four red-hot oyster shells in a quart of cider and blistering with cantharides." It is believed that he died from the opiate overdose (1672). Father Thomas in India had a miraculous disappearance of his kidney stone after praying to Mother Teresa.

Conclusion

The historical records of distinguished people give us an insight to the prevailing management of stones in the corresponding period. 

P9-7

Introduction

In spite of their divine powers, the holy men and women have suffered from urinary stones since antiquity. This presentation explores the fascinating history.

Methods

A search for sources was undertaken using the Internet and library sources.

Results

St Alban of Mainz is said to be the patron saint of kidney stones. The Greek Philosopher Epicurus who preached freedom from fear (ataraxia) and from pain (aponia) died from an obstructing ureteric stone (270BC). Pope Innocent XI underwent surgery for kidney stones and following his death in 1689, he was found to have "stones weighing nine ounces in the left kidney and six ounces in the right”.  Martin Luther, a German monk, was also a sufferer of kidney stones. He consequently almost faced death from being ‘unable to urinate’. It was the movement of the carriage on the journey home that prompted spontaneous stone passage and ‘spared his life.’ The Bishop of Chester and founder of the Royal Society, John Wilkins, had the distinction of heading a college at both the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. To treat his kidney stones, he was fed, "four red-hot oyster shells in a quart of cider and blistering with cantharides." It is believed that he died from the opiate overdose (1672). Father Thomas in India had a miraculous disappearance of his kidney stone after praying to Mother Teresa.

Conclusion

The historical records of distinguished people give us an insight to the prevailing management of stones in the corresponding period. 

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