Does supersensitive PSA add additional prognostic benefit to predicting biochemical recurrence in post radical prostatectomy patients at medium term follow up?
BAUS ePoster online library. Hughes K. 06/30/16; 132015; P10-15
Ms. Kaylie Hughes
Ms. Kaylie Hughes
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Abstract
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P10-15

Aim

To determine if supersensitive PSA nadir (SSPSAN) post radical prostatectomy is a significant prognostic indicator for predicting the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) and can help identify patients who may be safely managed conservatively.

Method

Retrospective analysis was undertaken of 271 men with a SSPSAN who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy at our institution between 2008 and 2013. Eighteen patients with PSA >0.1 ng/ml were excluded. 253 eligible patients were divided into 2 groups; SSPSAN≤0.01g/dl and SSPSAN between 0.02-0.1ng/dl. Demographic data, Pre-op PSA, post-operative Gleason score, pathological T-stage, margin status, lymph node involvement and BCR/salvage treatment (BCR/STMT) was recorded.  Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to compare time to (BCR/STMT). Multivariable cox regression was used to evaluate the relationships between SSPSAN and identify men at higher risk of BCR. SPSSv23 used for statistical analysis.

Results

Two hundred and fourteen men (85%) had SSPSAN ≤0.01ng/dl (Group-A) and 39 men (15%) SSPSAN between 0.02-0.1ng/dl (Group-B). At a mean follow up 56.0 months (range 29.2-84.631 (12.3%) had BCR; defined as serum PSA>0.2ng/dl (15/48.4%); or salvage treatment (16/51.6%) for high or rising PSA<0.2ng/dl. Kaplan-Meier estimates showed men with SSPSN≥0.02ng/dl had a significantly higher rate of BCR/STMT than those with SSPSAN ≤0.01ng/dl (Log-rank: p=0.00). Multivariable cox regression; backward method showed SSPSAN≥0.02g/dl was the only significant independent variable for predicting BCR (p=0.000).

Conclusion

SSPSAN is a significant independent predictor of BCR or adjuvant treatment. Men with a SSPSA ≤0.01ng/dl even in the presence of other adverse pathology could undergo conservative management.  

 

 

P10-15

Aim

To determine if supersensitive PSA nadir (SSPSAN) post radical prostatectomy is a significant prognostic indicator for predicting the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) and can help identify patients who may be safely managed conservatively.

Method

Retrospective analysis was undertaken of 271 men with a SSPSAN who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy at our institution between 2008 and 2013. Eighteen patients with PSA >0.1 ng/ml were excluded. 253 eligible patients were divided into 2 groups; SSPSAN≤0.01g/dl and SSPSAN between 0.02-0.1ng/dl. Demographic data, Pre-op PSA, post-operative Gleason score, pathological T-stage, margin status, lymph node involvement and BCR/salvage treatment (BCR/STMT) was recorded.  Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to compare time to (BCR/STMT). Multivariable cox regression was used to evaluate the relationships between SSPSAN and identify men at higher risk of BCR. SPSSv23 used for statistical analysis.

Results

Two hundred and fourteen men (85%) had SSPSAN ≤0.01ng/dl (Group-A) and 39 men (15%) SSPSAN between 0.02-0.1ng/dl (Group-B). At a mean follow up 56.0 months (range 29.2-84.631 (12.3%) had BCR; defined as serum PSA>0.2ng/dl (15/48.4%); or salvage treatment (16/51.6%) for high or rising PSA<0.2ng/dl. Kaplan-Meier estimates showed men with SSPSN≥0.02ng/dl had a significantly higher rate of BCR/STMT than those with SSPSAN ≤0.01ng/dl (Log-rank: p=0.00). Multivariable cox regression; backward method showed SSPSAN≥0.02g/dl was the only significant independent variable for predicting BCR (p=0.000).

Conclusion

SSPSAN is a significant independent predictor of BCR or adjuvant treatment. Men with a SSPSA ≤0.01ng/dl even in the presence of other adverse pathology could undergo conservative management.  

 

 

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