Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as a biomarker of renal injury in patients with ureteric stones
BAUS ePoster online library. Bolgeri M. 06/30/16; 132024; P11-9 Disclosure(s): None
Mr. Marco Bolgeri
Mr. Marco Bolgeri
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Abstract
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P11-9

Introduction

In patients with acute unilateral ureteric obstruction, creatinine and urine output measurement have significant pitfalls as markers of renal injury in the presence of a normal contralateral kidneys.

A biomarker may allow early detection of renal injury. NGAL has shown good performance as predictor of renal injury in different scenarios.

This study analyzes the kinetics of NGAL in patients with acute obstruction secondary to ureteric stones.

 

Material and Methods

Serum (sNGAL) and urine (uNGAL) levels were measured pre-, intra- and postoperatively in 37 subjects with ureteric colic, and compared with two control groups (13 patients with non-obstructive renal stones undergoing elective surgery and 10 healthy controls).

Samples were analyzed with a commercially available turbidometric immunoassay.

Multivariate analysis evaluated the correlation of NGAL with routine clinical parameters.

 

Results

sNGAL decreased significantly after relief of ureteric obstruction (77ng/mL vs 82ng/mL, p=0.01). uNGAL in the urine from the obstructed kidney was significantly higher than in the bladder.

In patients who passed their stone, at 4 weeks’ follow-up NGAL levels were significantly lower (p=0.03).

NGAL at presentation was significantly lower in healthy controls (p=0.003).

Surgery didn’t significantly affect levels of pNGAL and uNGAL (p=0.61 and p=0.09).

 

Conclusions

Relief of obstruction led to a significant decrease in NGAL levels.

Surgical intervention did not act as a confounder.

These observations suggest that NGAL could help estimating renal injury due to obstructive stones and act as a marker of de-obstruction during follow-up.

Further studies are needed to establish the significance of these for the clinical decision-making.

P11-9

Introduction

In patients with acute unilateral ureteric obstruction, creatinine and urine output measurement have significant pitfalls as markers of renal injury in the presence of a normal contralateral kidneys.

A biomarker may allow early detection of renal injury. NGAL has shown good performance as predictor of renal injury in different scenarios.

This study analyzes the kinetics of NGAL in patients with acute obstruction secondary to ureteric stones.

 

Material and Methods

Serum (sNGAL) and urine (uNGAL) levels were measured pre-, intra- and postoperatively in 37 subjects with ureteric colic, and compared with two control groups (13 patients with non-obstructive renal stones undergoing elective surgery and 10 healthy controls).

Samples were analyzed with a commercially available turbidometric immunoassay.

Multivariate analysis evaluated the correlation of NGAL with routine clinical parameters.

 

Results

sNGAL decreased significantly after relief of ureteric obstruction (77ng/mL vs 82ng/mL, p=0.01). uNGAL in the urine from the obstructed kidney was significantly higher than in the bladder.

In patients who passed their stone, at 4 weeks’ follow-up NGAL levels were significantly lower (p=0.03).

NGAL at presentation was significantly lower in healthy controls (p=0.003).

Surgery didn’t significantly affect levels of pNGAL and uNGAL (p=0.61 and p=0.09).

 

Conclusions

Relief of obstruction led to a significant decrease in NGAL levels.

Surgical intervention did not act as a confounder.

These observations suggest that NGAL could help estimating renal injury due to obstructive stones and act as a marker of de-obstruction during follow-up.

Further studies are needed to establish the significance of these for the clinical decision-making.

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