Quality of life outcome in bladder cancer patients after robotic radical cystectomy and intracorporeal urinary diversion
Author(s):
Dr Mohammed Abozaid
,
Dr Mohammed Abozaid
Affiliations:
Dr Mohammed Zahran
,
Dr Mohammed Zahran
Affiliations:
Prof Fatma Alserafy
,
Prof Fatma Alserafy
Affiliations:
Dr Wei Shen Tan
,
Dr Wei Shen Tan
Affiliations:
Ms Hilary Baker
,
Ms Hilary Baker
Affiliations:
Prof John Kelly
Prof John Kelly
Affiliations:
BAUS ePoster online library. Abozaid M. 06/26/17; 177345; P1-18
Dr. Mohammed Abozaid
Dr. Mohammed Abozaid
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Abstract
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Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of post-operative complications on quality of life of patients with bladder cancer who had robotic radical cystectomy and total intra-corporeal diversion (iRARC).

Patients and method: This cross sectional cohort study was conducted on surviving, tumour free patients who had iRARC between 2012 and 2015 at a single centre and completed one year after surgery. Quality of life was evaluated using the EORTC-QLQ-C30, which is a validated cancer specific questionnaire, and the EORTC-QLQ-BLM30, an invasive bladder cancer specific questionnaire.

Results: At the time of the study 76 patients who had iRARC, were alive and tumour free. Median follow-up was 21 months (IQR: 17-36 months). The response rate to both questionnaires was 61 % (n=47), where 32 patients had ileal conduit and 15 had orthotopic neobladder for urinary diversion.
Overall, quality of life domains were better in patients with neobladders, however, they tend to be younger with lower ASA than ileal conduit patients.
Twenty-two patients developed late complications. Patient who developed late complications have statistically significant worse functional and quality of life scores and higher symptom scores.
There was also a significant correlation between anaerobic threshold, evaluated by cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and fatigue (p =0.036, r =-0.362) scores.

Conclusion: iRARC offers good quality of life outcomes for bladder cancer patients. Neobladder patients have better scores than ileal conduit patients, however, they tend to be fitter. Development of late complications appears to have the greatest effect on patients quality of life


Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of post-operative complications on quality of life of patients with bladder cancer who had robotic radical cystectomy and total intra-corporeal diversion (iRARC).

Patients and method: This cross sectional cohort study was conducted on surviving, tumour free patients who had iRARC between 2012 and 2015 at a single centre and completed one year after surgery. Quality of life was evaluated using the EORTC-QLQ-C30, which is a validated cancer specific questionnaire, and the EORTC-QLQ-BLM30, an invasive bladder cancer specific questionnaire.

Results: At the time of the study 76 patients who had iRARC, were alive and tumour free. Median follow-up was 21 months (IQR: 17-36 months). The response rate to both questionnaires was 61 % (n=47), where 32 patients had ileal conduit and 15 had orthotopic neobladder for urinary diversion.
Overall, quality of life domains were better in patients with neobladders, however, they tend to be younger with lower ASA than ileal conduit patients.
Twenty-two patients developed late complications. Patient who developed late complications have statistically significant worse functional and quality of life scores and higher symptom scores.
There was also a significant correlation between anaerobic threshold, evaluated by cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and fatigue (p =0.036, r =-0.362) scores.

Conclusion: iRARC offers good quality of life outcomes for bladder cancer patients. Neobladder patients have better scores than ileal conduit patients, however, they tend to be fitter. Development of late complications appears to have the greatest effect on patients quality of life


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