The Geography of Urolithiasis in England. A Ten-Year review of Trends in Prevalence by Locality, Ethnicity, Gender and Age
Author(s):
Miss Holly Ni Raghallaigh
,
Miss Holly Ni Raghallaigh
Affiliations:
Mr Dene Ellis
,
Mr Dene Ellis
Affiliations:
Mr Andrew Symes
Mr Andrew Symes
Affiliations:
BAUS ePoster online library. Ni Raghallaigh H. 06/26/17; 177357; P3-1
Dr. Holly Ni Raghallaigh
Dr. Holly Ni Raghallaigh
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Abstract
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Introduction
The prevalence of kidney stones has been increasing, producing a significant impact on hospital services. There is sparse available literature regarding incidence trends of urolithiasis in England. As implications for centralisation of stone services and the potential for identifying the high risk patients become increasingly relevant we hypothesized there may be ‘hot spots’ of stone occurrence which could prompt epidemiological research, to plan local service delivery.

Materials
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and mid-year population estimates were used to calculate Urolithiasis rates in England from 2003-2014. Information regarding age, gender, ethnicity, Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) decile and local authority (LA) district of residence were obtained.

Results
The prevalence of urolithiasis in England grew by 33.7% over the study period. The LA with the greatest increase was South Cambridgeshire. Regional grouping of LA’s was also geographically mapped. The age group 85+ showed the greatest growth throughout the study period, with absolute growth of 106.6% and an annual compound rate of growth of 7.35% while the 15-44 age group stabilised. Prevalence in men and women has increased from 16.6 & 7.06 per 10,000 to 20.84 & 10.74 respectively. A significant relationship between IMD score and urolithiasis was identified.

Conclusions
'Hot spots' of stone activity exist, and analysis of our urolithiasis prevalence reveals a relationship with socieconimic status and ethnicity. These results carry importance when considering risk-assessing patients for stone disease, targeting specific population groups for lifestyle advice, and also carry implications in stone service delivery in 'at risk' areas.
Introduction
The prevalence of kidney stones has been increasing, producing a significant impact on hospital services. There is sparse available literature regarding incidence trends of urolithiasis in England. As implications for centralisation of stone services and the potential for identifying the high risk patients become increasingly relevant we hypothesized there may be ‘hot spots’ of stone occurrence which could prompt epidemiological research, to plan local service delivery.

Materials
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and mid-year population estimates were used to calculate Urolithiasis rates in England from 2003-2014. Information regarding age, gender, ethnicity, Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) decile and local authority (LA) district of residence were obtained.

Results
The prevalence of urolithiasis in England grew by 33.7% over the study period. The LA with the greatest increase was South Cambridgeshire. Regional grouping of LA’s was also geographically mapped. The age group 85+ showed the greatest growth throughout the study period, with absolute growth of 106.6% and an annual compound rate of growth of 7.35% while the 15-44 age group stabilised. Prevalence in men and women has increased from 16.6 & 7.06 per 10,000 to 20.84 & 10.74 respectively. A significant relationship between IMD score and urolithiasis was identified.

Conclusions
'Hot spots' of stone activity exist, and analysis of our urolithiasis prevalence reveals a relationship with socieconimic status and ethnicity. These results carry importance when considering risk-assessing patients for stone disease, targeting specific population groups for lifestyle advice, and also carry implications in stone service delivery in 'at risk' areas.
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