The impact of obesity on PCNL outcome: Analysis of a UK national database
Author(s):
Mr James Armitage
,
Mr James Armitage
Affiliations:
Mrs Sarah Fowler
,
Mrs Sarah Fowler
Affiliations:
Mr John Withington
,
Mr John Withington
Affiliations:
Mr Neil Burgess
,
Mr Neil Burgess
Affiliations:
Mr William Finch
,
Mr William Finch
Affiliations:
Mr Stuart Irving
,
Mr Stuart Irving
Affiliations:
Mr Jonathan Glass
,
Mr Jonathan Glass
Affiliations:
Mr Oliver Wiseman
Mr Oliver Wiseman
Affiliations:
BAUS ePoster online library. Withington J. 06/26/17; 177363; P3-7
Mr. John Withington
Mr. John Withington
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Abstract
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Introduction and Objective
There is an obesity epidemic in the Western world. The objective of this study was to investigate whether obesity affected PCNL outcome.

Methods
Data submitted to a UK national registry between 2010 and 2015 were analysed according to BMI. We evaluated patient demographics and outcomes including complications and stone free rate.

Results
BMI was recorded for 3,439 (48.6%) of 7,062 procedures. Of these, 2,538 patients (74%) were either overweight (35%) or obese (39%) and only 802 (23.4%) had a normal body weight. Two thirds of patients of normal weight had no comorbidity (Charlson score 0) but this fell to only half (51%) of those who were obese. Rates of failed access (about 1%) and abandonment of procedure (about 5%) appeared independent of BMI. Intraoperative complications were commonest in obese patients compared to other BMI groups combined (8.3% vs 6.4%, p=0.04) and there was a non-significant trend to higher post-operative complication rate (19.8% vs 15.8%, p=0.08). Fever/sepsis rate was higher in obese patients (15.0% vs 12.4%, p=0.04) but transfusion rate was not (2.2% vs 2.8%, p=0.32). Stone free rate was not significantly lower in obese patients compared to the other BMI groups (69.7% vs 72.9%, p=0.07).

Conclusions
About three quarters of patients having PCNL in the UK are clinically overweight or obese (BMI≥25) and this was associated with greater comorbidity. Stone free rates were comparable in all groups and the complication rate was only slightly higher in obese patients.
Introduction and Objective
There is an obesity epidemic in the Western world. The objective of this study was to investigate whether obesity affected PCNL outcome.

Methods
Data submitted to a UK national registry between 2010 and 2015 were analysed according to BMI. We evaluated patient demographics and outcomes including complications and stone free rate.

Results
BMI was recorded for 3,439 (48.6%) of 7,062 procedures. Of these, 2,538 patients (74%) were either overweight (35%) or obese (39%) and only 802 (23.4%) had a normal body weight. Two thirds of patients of normal weight had no comorbidity (Charlson score 0) but this fell to only half (51%) of those who were obese. Rates of failed access (about 1%) and abandonment of procedure (about 5%) appeared independent of BMI. Intraoperative complications were commonest in obese patients compared to other BMI groups combined (8.3% vs 6.4%, p=0.04) and there was a non-significant trend to higher post-operative complication rate (19.8% vs 15.8%, p=0.08). Fever/sepsis rate was higher in obese patients (15.0% vs 12.4%, p=0.04) but transfusion rate was not (2.2% vs 2.8%, p=0.32). Stone free rate was not significantly lower in obese patients compared to the other BMI groups (69.7% vs 72.9%, p=0.07).

Conclusions
About three quarters of patients having PCNL in the UK are clinically overweight or obese (BMI≥25) and this was associated with greater comorbidity. Stone free rates were comparable in all groups and the complication rate was only slightly higher in obese patients.
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