The Incidence of Ischaemic Priapism in Men with Stuttering Priapism and its Effect on Erectile Function
Author(s):
Dr Mark Johnson
,
Dr Mark Johnson
Affiliations:
Mr Thomas Johnson
,
Mr Thomas Johnson
Affiliations:
Miss Odunayo Kalejaiye
,
Miss Odunayo Kalejaiye
Affiliations:
Mr Amr Raheem
,
Mr Amr Raheem
Affiliations:
Mr Asif Muneer
,
Mr Asif Muneer
Affiliations:
Mr David Ralph
Mr David Ralph
Affiliations:
BAUS ePoster online library. Johnson M. 06/27/17; 177367; P4-1
Mark Johnson
Mark Johnson
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Abstract
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Objectives: Stuttering priapism is characterised by recurrent painful erections which are usually self-limiting. The pathogenesis is unknown, but most commonly occurs in association with haematological conditions, particularly sickle cell disease (SCD). The consequences of ineffective treatment are erectile dysfunction (ED) and a reduction in quality of life.

Methods: Retrospective case-series of 111 patients with stuttering priapism between 2010-2015.

Results: The mean age of the patients is 39.6 ± 1.3 years. The median frequency of episodes of prolonged erection is 7 (per week). The mean duration of episodes of prolonged erection is 2.4 ± 0.3 hours. The aetiology is classified into: SCD (47.3%), idiopathic (42.7%), pharmacological (7.3%) and sickle-cell trait (2.7%). The incidence of patients having had an episode of ischaemic Priapism in this series is 53.2%. There is no significant difference (P=0.849) between the incidence of ischaemic priapism between the SCD and idiopathic groups. The overall incidence of ED was 23.4%. The incidence of ED following an episode of ischaemic priapism in patients with stuttering priapism is 30.5%. This is compared to 15.4% in those that have never experienced an episodes of ischaemic priapism. This difference tended towards significance (P=0.065).

Conclusion: Greater than 50% of the patients experienced an episode of ischaemic priapism. Men who have had an episode of ischaemic priapism are twice as likely to have ED compared to those that had never had an episode of ischaemic priapism. Effective prophylaxis to prevent episodes of ischaemic priapism should be the primary focus in the management of stuttering priapism.
Objectives: Stuttering priapism is characterised by recurrent painful erections which are usually self-limiting. The pathogenesis is unknown, but most commonly occurs in association with haematological conditions, particularly sickle cell disease (SCD). The consequences of ineffective treatment are erectile dysfunction (ED) and a reduction in quality of life.

Methods: Retrospective case-series of 111 patients with stuttering priapism between 2010-2015.

Results: The mean age of the patients is 39.6 ± 1.3 years. The median frequency of episodes of prolonged erection is 7 (per week). The mean duration of episodes of prolonged erection is 2.4 ± 0.3 hours. The aetiology is classified into: SCD (47.3%), idiopathic (42.7%), pharmacological (7.3%) and sickle-cell trait (2.7%). The incidence of patients having had an episode of ischaemic Priapism in this series is 53.2%. There is no significant difference (P=0.849) between the incidence of ischaemic priapism between the SCD and idiopathic groups. The overall incidence of ED was 23.4%. The incidence of ED following an episode of ischaemic priapism in patients with stuttering priapism is 30.5%. This is compared to 15.4% in those that have never experienced an episodes of ischaemic priapism. This difference tended towards significance (P=0.065).

Conclusion: Greater than 50% of the patients experienced an episode of ischaemic priapism. Men who have had an episode of ischaemic priapism are twice as likely to have ED compared to those that had never had an episode of ischaemic priapism. Effective prophylaxis to prevent episodes of ischaemic priapism should be the primary focus in the management of stuttering priapism.
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