Erectile Dysfunction Clinic: An opportunity to identify sleep apnoea?
Author(s):
Miss Odunayo Kalejaiye
,
Miss Odunayo Kalejaiye
Affiliations:
Mr Amr Moubasher
,
Mr Amr Moubasher
Affiliations:
Mr Marco Capece
,
Mr Marco Capece
Affiliations:
Mr A. Abdel Raheem
,
Mr A. Abdel Raheem
Affiliations:
Ms Sara McNeillis
,
Ms Sara McNeillis
Affiliations:
Mr Asif Muneer
,
Mr Asif Muneer
Affiliations:
Mr Nim Christopher
,
Mr Nim Christopher
Affiliations:
Mr Giulio Garaffa
,
Mr Giulio Garaffa
Affiliations:
Mr David Ralph
Mr David Ralph
Affiliations:
BAUS ePoster online library. Kalejaiye O. 06/27/17; 177368; P4-2
Ms. Odunayo Kalejaiye
Ms. Odunayo Kalejaiye
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Abstract
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Introduction
Erectile dysfunction (ED) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) share many risk factors; both are increasing in prevalence and may co-exist. Both conditions represent opportunities to modify risk factors and prevent future cardiovascular disease. OSA is under recognised in clinical practice.

Aims
The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and prevalence of identifying OSA in men with ED.
Methods
A prospective study of men referred to a specialist clinic for ED. Men included in the study completed 4 questionnaires: IIEF and 3 sleep questionnaires. Men scoring 3 or more on the OSA questionnaire were referred for sleep study. The control group consisted of men scoring less than 3 on the OSA questionnaire.

Results
Over a six month period ending September 2016, 137 men completed the study questionnaires. 53% (n=72) had OSA score ≥3. This group was older (60.8 vs. 46.1) with a slightly higher BMI (29.4 vs. 25.9) when compared to the control group (OSA score <3). The sleep apnoea group had worse total IIEF (22.7 vs. 31.6) and IIEF-ED (5.9 vs. 9.8) scores than the control group. The control group were less likely to have sleep disorders (insomnia severity scores 6.2 vs. 8.0; sleep disorder score 2.4 vs. 3.5).

Conclusion
Men presenting to the andrology clinic with ED are at significant risk of having undiagnosed sleep apnoea. They are also at increased risk of subthreshold insomnia and a moderate chance of sleep disorders. Screening for OSA should be included in the assessment of men with ED
Introduction
Erectile dysfunction (ED) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) share many risk factors; both are increasing in prevalence and may co-exist. Both conditions represent opportunities to modify risk factors and prevent future cardiovascular disease. OSA is under recognised in clinical practice.

Aims
The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and prevalence of identifying OSA in men with ED.
Methods
A prospective study of men referred to a specialist clinic for ED. Men included in the study completed 4 questionnaires: IIEF and 3 sleep questionnaires. Men scoring 3 or more on the OSA questionnaire were referred for sleep study. The control group consisted of men scoring less than 3 on the OSA questionnaire.

Results
Over a six month period ending September 2016, 137 men completed the study questionnaires. 53% (n=72) had OSA score ≥3. This group was older (60.8 vs. 46.1) with a slightly higher BMI (29.4 vs. 25.9) when compared to the control group (OSA score <3). The sleep apnoea group had worse total IIEF (22.7 vs. 31.6) and IIEF-ED (5.9 vs. 9.8) scores than the control group. The control group were less likely to have sleep disorders (insomnia severity scores 6.2 vs. 8.0; sleep disorder score 2.4 vs. 3.5).

Conclusion
Men presenting to the andrology clinic with ED are at significant risk of having undiagnosed sleep apnoea. They are also at increased risk of subthreshold insomnia and a moderate chance of sleep disorders. Screening for OSA should be included in the assessment of men with ED
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