Impact of lymphoedema on quality of life following radical lymph node dissection for penile cancer
Author(s):
Miss Sylvia Yan
,
Miss Sylvia Yan
Affiliations:
Sister Janice Minter
,
Sister Janice Minter
Affiliations:
Mr Wayne Lam
,
Mr Wayne Lam
Affiliations:
Mr Davendra Sharma
,
Mr Davendra Sharma
Affiliations:
Mr Nicholas Watkin
,
Mr Nicholas Watkin
Affiliations:
Mr Benjamin Ayres
Mr Benjamin Ayres
Affiliations:
BAUS ePoster online library. Yan S. 06/27/17; 177377; P4-11
Ms. Sylvia Yan
Ms. Sylvia Yan
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
Introduction

Inguinal and pelvic lymphadenectomy in penile cancer can result in significant lymphoedema. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of any lower limb and/or genital lymphoedema on quality of life using a validated questionnaire.

Methods

Between June and December 2015, 26 patients who attended clinic for surveillance following their lymph node surgery were asked to complete the validated LYMQOL LEG questionnaire. 1 declined and was excluded from analysis. 16 had both inguinal and pelvic lymph node dissections. 12 had adjuvant inguinal +/- pelvic chemoradiotherapy.

Results

Median patient age was 62 years (IQR 61-65). Median time since nodal surgery was 25 months (IQR 18-36). Functional questions scored poorer overall. Comparing inguinal lymphadenectomy only to inguinal and pelvic lymphadenectomy, 22% men averaged a poor overall score on the functional quality of life domain compared with 50%. For the appearance domain it was 11% vs 13%, symptoms domain 11% vs 25%, and mood domain 0% vs 38%. Median overall quality of life score was 9/10 (range 4-10) vs 8/10 (4-10). In men who had inguinal lymphadenectomy only, 50% had no visible lymphoedema, 33% were rated as mild and 17% moderate. In men who had inguinal and pelvic lymphadenectomy, 36% were assessed as having mild lymphoedema, 43% moderate and 21% severe.

Conclusion

Inguinal and pelvic lymphadenectomy in penile cancer has a significant negative impact on ability to perform day-to-day functions. Patients had fewer concerns over appearance, symptoms and mood. However, they generally score their overall quality of life quite high.
Introduction

Inguinal and pelvic lymphadenectomy in penile cancer can result in significant lymphoedema. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of any lower limb and/or genital lymphoedema on quality of life using a validated questionnaire.

Methods

Between June and December 2015, 26 patients who attended clinic for surveillance following their lymph node surgery were asked to complete the validated LYMQOL LEG questionnaire. 1 declined and was excluded from analysis. 16 had both inguinal and pelvic lymph node dissections. 12 had adjuvant inguinal +/- pelvic chemoradiotherapy.

Results

Median patient age was 62 years (IQR 61-65). Median time since nodal surgery was 25 months (IQR 18-36). Functional questions scored poorer overall. Comparing inguinal lymphadenectomy only to inguinal and pelvic lymphadenectomy, 22% men averaged a poor overall score on the functional quality of life domain compared with 50%. For the appearance domain it was 11% vs 13%, symptoms domain 11% vs 25%, and mood domain 0% vs 38%. Median overall quality of life score was 9/10 (range 4-10) vs 8/10 (4-10). In men who had inguinal lymphadenectomy only, 50% had no visible lymphoedema, 33% were rated as mild and 17% moderate. In men who had inguinal and pelvic lymphadenectomy, 36% were assessed as having mild lymphoedema, 43% moderate and 21% severe.

Conclusion

Inguinal and pelvic lymphadenectomy in penile cancer has a significant negative impact on ability to perform day-to-day functions. Patients had fewer concerns over appearance, symptoms and mood. However, they generally score their overall quality of life quite high.
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies