The Aero-urethroscope
Author(s):
Miss Pravisha Ravindra
,
Miss Pravisha Ravindra
Affiliations:
Mr Jonathan Goddard
Mr Jonathan Goddard
Affiliations:
BAUS ePoster online library. Ravindra P. 06/27/17; 177386; P5-5
Ms. Pravisha Ravindra
Ms. Pravisha Ravindra
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Abstract
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Introduction
While the development of the urethroscope and the cystoscope are linked, the two procedures of urethroscopy and cystoscopy were quite separate. The principle of using air-insufflation to visualize and treat diseases of the urethra gave rise to the aero-urethroscope. We report on its creation and usage.

Methods
A systematic search of the literature using the keywords 'aerourethroscope', ‘aerourethroscopy’, ‘air + urethroscopy’ and ‘air + urethroscope’ was conducted.

Results
The earliest report of using air-inflation in male urethroscopy was by Geza Von Antal of Budapest in 1887. The instrument was a modified Grunfield urethroscope using an external light source and head mirror to reflect illumination down the scope. It was designed to distend urethral walls so that all inflated portions could be inspected. In 1896 in London, J Swift Joly published in the Lancet ‘An operating and observation urethroscope’. George Luys in 1902 added a magnifying lens to allow detailed examination. It was recommended that urethroscopy was carried out a day before cystoscopy in case any obstruction was encountered. Although cystoscopy was felt to be a specialist procedure, urethroscopy was deemed to be suitable for non-specialists such as GPs and venereologists. The technique of air cystoscopy was soon abandoned but the aero-urethroscope remained in use into the 1950’s.

Conclusion
Air appeared to be a comfortable medium to distend the urethra for maximal visualization. Despite the introduction of irrigant fluid for cystoscopy, urologists continued to use aero-urethroscopy as a separate distinct method for many years after the abandonment of air cystoscopy.
Introduction
While the development of the urethroscope and the cystoscope are linked, the two procedures of urethroscopy and cystoscopy were quite separate. The principle of using air-insufflation to visualize and treat diseases of the urethra gave rise to the aero-urethroscope. We report on its creation and usage.

Methods
A systematic search of the literature using the keywords 'aerourethroscope', ‘aerourethroscopy’, ‘air + urethroscopy’ and ‘air + urethroscope’ was conducted.

Results
The earliest report of using air-inflation in male urethroscopy was by Geza Von Antal of Budapest in 1887. The instrument was a modified Grunfield urethroscope using an external light source and head mirror to reflect illumination down the scope. It was designed to distend urethral walls so that all inflated portions could be inspected. In 1896 in London, J Swift Joly published in the Lancet ‘An operating and observation urethroscope’. George Luys in 1902 added a magnifying lens to allow detailed examination. It was recommended that urethroscopy was carried out a day before cystoscopy in case any obstruction was encountered. Although cystoscopy was felt to be a specialist procedure, urethroscopy was deemed to be suitable for non-specialists such as GPs and venereologists. The technique of air cystoscopy was soon abandoned but the aero-urethroscope remained in use into the 1950’s.

Conclusion
Air appeared to be a comfortable medium to distend the urethra for maximal visualization. Despite the introduction of irrigant fluid for cystoscopy, urologists continued to use aero-urethroscopy as a separate distinct method for many years after the abandonment of air cystoscopy.
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